2014 Foley Telemedicine Survey - Executive Summary

Read the full copy of the 2014 Foley Telemedicine Survey - Executive Summary here or check out the excerpt below:

As health care executives transform operations to comply with the Affordable Care Act, they are gearing up for the next monumental shift in the industry: telemedicine.

Technology has influenced nearly every sector of the economy, and the health care industry is following suit. Among telemedicine’s many benefits are the potential to exponentially expand a provider’s geographic footprint, use doctors’ time more efficiently and dramatically reduce the barriers to patient interaction. 

Health care leaders tell us that their organizations are committed to continuing to implement telemedicine programs, even as they face challenges such as getting doctors to buy into the programs and insurers to pay for them. Why? For the majority of respondents, it’s simple — they believe telemedicine will help them keep patients healthier. 

This report is based on feedback from health care leaders, the majority of whom are C-level executives from for-profit and nonprofit care providers, including hospitals, home health organizations and physician group practices. We asked them to evaluate the prospects for improved patient care and streamlined operations through telemedicine advancements, as well as regulatory hurdles and obstacles to reimbursement. 

Executives Are Embracing Telemedicine

Telemedicine is not a distant possibility; it is here and in play now. The vast majority of leaders (90 percent) report that their organizations have already begun developing or implementing a telemedicine program. 

Most also say that offering meaningful telemedicine services will be critical to the future success of their organizations. 

  • Eighty-four (84) percent of respondents felt that the development of telemedicine services is either very important (52 percent) or important (32 percent) to their organizations. Virtually none said they considered the technology to be unimportant (3 percent). 
  • While just 6 percent of respondents categorized their telemedicine programs as “mature,” only 8 percent said they had none at all. The remainders of responses are clustered somewhere in the middle: 34 percent are under consideration or in development, 18 percent are in the optimization phase, and the remaining 36 percent are being piloted or implemented. 
  • A majority of respondents already offer remote monitoring (64 percent), store and forward technology (54 percent), and real-time interaction capabilities (52 percent). Additionally, 39 percent say they have services that qualify as mHealth — patient-driven apps and online portals.

Read the full copy of the 2014 Foley Telemedicine Survey - Executive Summary here